Tag Archives: state

GradCertNLP: Winter Intensive 2015

20 Jul 15
Daniel Smith
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Enhance your performance, your relationships and your quality of life.

Some people will use these skills to be a more effective professional. Others focus on how they can be better in their personal life – as a parents, spouse or friend. Still others use these patterns to cultivate their inner strength, resilience and to expand their personal power and choice so you can create the life you want, living on your terms. Just in the first five-day unit, we will be helping you to:

  • Develop the charisma and rapport to subconsciously influence others in multiple ways, including using your own state.
  • Influence your own subjective experience – and the experience of those around you.
  • Develop new perspectives on situations, relationships and contexts with others, so you can appreciate situations from different points of view.
  • Enjoy more freedom in choosing your state and responses so you can enhance your relationships.
  • Learn to harness your vestibular representational system (your sense of balance).
  • Experience, design, develop and apply high performance states.
  • Bring the best of the past into the present: Access and use resourceful states from your personal history, and the personal history of others, so you can use these in the present and future.
  • Design outcomes that are personally meaningful and structured so they drive you towards your objectives.
  • Frame intentions and consequences for ‘personal ecology’ so you can enjoy more alignment and personal congruence.
  • Directly experience and understand differences in thinking patterns and styles.
  • Appreciate the many ways we create meaning from experience, thereby expanding your choices and opportunities to influence.
  • Represent and change our experiences in the world.
  • Track and influence the states of those around you.

But remember, that’s just the beginning.

In Part 1 (20 July – 14 August)

Unit 1: VU20480 Experience NLP Fundamentals
Unit 2: VU20481 Elicit Information and Generate Solutions
Unit 3: VU20482 Apply Interventions for Optimal Self-Management
Unit 4: VU20483 Metaphor and Strategies that Support Change and Development

In Part 2 (24 August – 18 September)

Unit 5: VU20484 Apply Advanced Processes to Personal and Organisational Change
Unit 6: VU20485 Perform NLP Modelling to Capture Expertise
Unit 7: VU20486 Design Advanced NLP Patterns
Unit 8: VU20487 Optimise Personal and Professional Effectiveness

Sessions will be conducted Monday to Friday, approximately 10am – 6pm.

While there are many options for becoming an “NLP Practitioner” or Master Practitioner, the Graduate Certificate in Neuro-Linguistic Programming is the Professional standard. More than just a great time, once you’ve attended our training, we expect you to be outstanding and to demonstrate the freedom to make exemplary choices in your life and actions, because you will have the benefit of learning how to make the changes in yourself and with those around you. Training is recognised under the Australian Qualifications FrameworkThis satisfies the requirements for 22133VIC Graduate Certificate in Neuro-linguistic Programming. Upon successful completion of the assessment, you will be issued with formal recognition from the RTO for this training, Inspiritive. For full details of policies, please see here.

By virtue of our accreditation, we are unable to offer discounts on our fees. But, if eligible, you may be able to use VET FEE-HELP to defer the whole costs of the training, similar to university fees. Please see the Student Fact Sheet for more details. For offline use, you can also download our brochure. Contact us for further details:

GradCertNLP: Autumn Intensive Part 1 2015

02 Mar 15
Daniel Smith
, , , , , ,
one comments

Enhance your performance, your relationships and your quality of life.

Some people will use these skills to be a more effective professional. Others focus on how they can be better in their personal life – as a parents, spouse or friend. Still others use these patterns to cultivate their inner strength, resilience and to expand their personal power and choice so you can create the life you want, living on your terms. Just in the first five-day unit, we will be helping you to:

  • Develop the charisma and rapport to subconsciously influence others in multiple ways, including using your own state.
  • Influence your own subjective experience – and the experience of those around you.
  • Develop new perspectives on situations, relationships and contexts with others, so you can appreciate situations from different points of view.
  • Enjoy more freedom in choosing your state and responses so you can enhance your relationships.
  • Learn to harness your vestibular representational system (your sense of balance).
  • Experience, design, develop and apply high performance states.
  • Bring the best of the past into the present: Access and use resourceful states from your personal history, and the personal history of others, so you can use these in the present and future.
  • Design outcomes that are personally meaningful and structured so they drive you towards your objectives.
  • Frame intentions and consequences for ‘personal ecology’ so you can enjoy more alignment and personal congruence.
  • Directly experience and understand differences in thinking patterns and styles.
  • Appreciate the many ways we create meaning from experience, thereby expanding your choices and opportunities to influence.
  • Represent and change our experiences in the world.
  • Track and influence the states of those around you.

But remember, that’s just the beginning.

Part 1: 2 – 27 March (Mondays to Fridays)

Unit 1: VU20480 Experience NLP Fundamentals
Unit 2: VU20481 Elicit Information and Generate Solutions
Unit 3: VU20482 Apply Interventions for Optimal Self-Management
Unit 4: VU20483 Metaphor and Strategies that Support Change and Development

Then you can join us for Part 2 (17 August – 11 September)

Unit 5: VU20484 Apply Advanced Processes to Personal and Organisational Change
Unit 6: VU20485 Perform NLP Modelling to Capture Expertise
Unit 7: VU20486 Design Advanced NLP Patterns
Unit 8: VU20487 Optimise Personal and Professional Effectiveness

All sessions will be conducted Monday to Friday, approximately 9am – 5pm.

While there are many options for becoming an “NLP Practitioner” or Master Practitioner, the Graduate Certificate in Neuro-Linguistic Programming is the Professional standard. More than just a great time, once you’ve attended our training, we expect you to be outstanding and to demonstrate the freedom to make exemplary choices in your life and actions, because you will have the benefit of learning how to make the changes in yourself and with those around you. Training is recognised under the Australian Qualifications FrameworkThis satisfies the requirements for 22133VIC Graduate Certificate in Neuro-linguistic Programming. Upon successful completion of the assessment, you will be issued with formal recognition from the RTO for this training, Inspiritive. For full details of policies, please see here.

By virtue of our accreditation, we are unable to offer discounts on our fees. But, if eligible, you may be able to use VET FEE-HELP to defer the whole costs of the training, similar to university fees. Please see the Student Fact Sheet for more details. For offline use, you can also download our brochure. Contact us for further details:

NLP for increasing your Influence Quotient

25 Mar 13
Daniel Smith
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Last Friday a small group of us were exploring how NLP can be used for influence. While the language patterns of the Meta Model, Milton Model and even Metaphor Model can be easily applied to increase your “Influence Quotient”, we were exploring this topic more comprehensively.

The first way that NLP can help increase your Influence Quotient is to help you focus on your intention. Influential communicators are powerful and congruent; they have found a way to get all their butterflies flying in formation so that their words, their tonality and their gestures are aligned to communicate a single message. For some people, this sort of alignment comes naturally; they say what they deeply mean and deeply mean whatever they say. For the rest of us, our own doubts – about ourselves or about what we are communicating – can come through even about something that we feel passionate about. By identifying, understanding and aligning with the intention of our message, we can immediately become more influential.

An easy way to do this is through Grinder’s Outcome, Intention, Consequences pattern. Augmenting this with the Core States process (covered in our trainings) can turn this elegant framework into a transformative process.

Another way to amplify your Influence Quotient is to work on your state. As a communicator, whether you are making a sales presentation, negotiating with your boss, speaking with your spouse or even your child, your state might be the biggest predictor of your ability to influence those around you. One of our recent participants told of how when he was on the ATP Tour (men’s professional tennis), a very young Boris Becker walked into the dressing room. This was before Becker had established himself by being the youngest ever Wimbledon Champion, and despite being surrounded by greats including Ivan Lendl, Becker’s “presence” so totally filled the room that everybody went silent. When you are communicating and want to be more influential, check your state! Take an inventory:

  • How are you breathing?
  • What is your posture?
  • What are you focusing upon?
  • What are you saying – to yourself, and to those around you?

But how can we change our state? Other than changing your physiology as I mentioned just before, changing your submodalities can have a powerful impact. By changing submodalities, one of my clients moved a negative, nagging, annoying voice that was leaving him immobilized with fear into a supportive, seductive reminder of the important risks for which he needed to prepare.

What are these magical submodalities? In the last example, the location of the voice and the sound quality are both examples of submodalities. For example, if you could imagine a beautiful picture, and really look at it, where do you see it? Straight in front of you? Up to the right? How far away is it? Is it in vivid colour or black and white? These are all examples of submodalities.

When I was a university student, I remember how through the semester the assignments and exams felt a long way away yet the day before an assignment was due or the night before an exam, the reality of that deadline would creep up on me and be straight in front or even on top of me! By pushing that internal representation of the assignment or exam away, I could relax and focus even amid intense pressure.

As a student of influence, notice how you are using submodalities to internally represent your message. How attractive does your message seem to you? How could you make it even more attractive or even seductive? What could you do to communicate that to your audience?

Intention, State and Submodalities are powerful tools for increasing our ability to influence those around us. Another tool that we can use to increase our Influence Quotient is that of Perceptual Positions. Merely recognizing that there are multiple perspectives at all can help us better frame and transfer our thoughts and feelings; the Perceptual Positions exercise (what we refer to as “Moving Chairs”) of moving from 3rd to 1st to 2nd to 3rd for a specific context, observing from a non-attached 3rd Position and a congruent 2nd Position, and recognizing that 1st Position is, while immensely valuable and important, just one perspective, can be very helpful. Try it out for yourself – notice how much your Influence Quotient lifts when you deliberately shift perceptual positions.

There is a lot that NLP can do to help you become more influential. In the two hours that we had to play with, exploring Intention, State, Submodalities, and Perceptual Positions was pretty ambitious… but good fun.

Happy New Year!

01 Jan 13
Daniel Smith

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You probably have your own way of bringing in the new year. Maybe you watch the fireworks, or a movie, or get together with friends. Some people like to set “resolutions”. I find the notion of re-solution as being a bit too close to repeatedly solving something, but I do like to prepare for the new year. Below is outlined what I’ve used in reviewing the year that has been and preparing for the year ahead, consisting of a series of states and corresponding questions. I hope that it’s useful for you:

State 1: Clarity
What happened in the past year?

  • What were the magic moments; these are those amazing times, the experiences that you want to remember because they were wonderful.
  • What did you accomplish in the past year? What are you most proud of?
  • What were any other big events? Anything else that was strongly positive that you want to repeat or negative that you would want to avoid.
  • What were your best decisions of the past year?

State 2: Certainty
Identify anything in your life that was once a dream. Think about any goals that you have accomplished, experiences that you made happen, physical objects that you once desired; You are after a state of certainty and confidence.

Read More…

How are you? How do you feel? How do you want to feel? How do you want to be?

14 Jan 12
Daniel Smith
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We are training our son to sleep in his own bed at the moment. Having grown accustomed to having his mother beside him, always ready to sooth him back to sleep, it has been a challenging transition for him. And he isn’t afraid to share that he’s upset, so our whole household has shared the experience of him screaming, crying and begging for his mother.

The first night was hard. It took several hours before he dropped off to sleep, only to awake again around dawn. The second night was also hard, though he more quickly came to understand that he was going to be sleeping in his own bed. The third night? We’ll find out tonight 🙂

My son’s feelings are largely an effect of his experiences. If I throw him up in the air, he’ll laugh. If I feed him some ice cream when he asks for it, he’ll smile. But even at this early age, it’s not a simple cause-effect relationship: If he’s in the ‘wrong mood’ and I throw him up in the air, he’ll still be crying when I catch him, and he won’t always want ice cream.

As we grow older, the relationship between how we feel and our experiences becomes more and more complicated. While one of the common presuppositions of NLP is “the meaning of communication is the response that you get”, if someone is angry with you for making fun at them, telling them that it’s their decision to feel bad or their fault that they are angry with you might not help you very much!

But you do have a lot of choice about how you feel, don’t you?

And if you want to change how you feel, you can, can’t you? I love playing music to ‘manipulate my state’ – there are some songs that I can listen to that will transform how I feel in just moments. Smells are powerful triggers too, as are seeing people or even just remembering something.

In NLPese, we talk about anchoring: Triggers that are used to access particular states. These triggers – these anchors – can take many forms, go across sensory systems, and powerfully affect our subjective experiences.

If you ask someone, “How satisfied are you with your life?” on a scale of 1 (terrible) to 10 (ideal), you will get a score that is one of the most widely used measure of life satisfaction. Amazingly enough, your mood determines more than 70% of your result!

Most of us aren’t taught how to choose how we feel.

But we can learn.

We can learn to use a negative experience to trigger a resourceful state.

We can learn to harness difficult people and confronting conversations.

We can learn to respond to difficulties and obstacles with tenacity and determination.

We can learn to accept reality rather than fantasizing that things were different.

You can learn to choose how you feel.

 

How you feel profoundly impacts how you live, relate and work. After all, if you can change how you feel, you can transform your state of being. What if you could learn to put yourself into the driver’s seat rather than being a victim of circumstances and outside influences?

Here are a few strategies that can help:

  1. Rhythm: Think about a challenging situation, relationship or context. Maybe someone that you work, or when you are at the gym, or even when you’re trying to sleep. You might notice what sort of rhythm that context seems to have; Or maybe it’s so erratic that it seems to have no rhythm at all! Then create a rhythm – something simple or something complex – that seems to “make sense” for that situation. Even something very simple to start with can make a huge difference. Take on this rhythm, maybe by clapping or even dancing, and maintain this rhythm as you start to think about the challenging context. When you lose the rhythm, just pause and regain the rhythm before going back to the context.
  2. Music: Listen to a piece of music while you think about the context. You might even try a few different styles of music, noticing what difference each makes to how you feel. Some of us have specific states that are really useful for us – these “high performance states” can be really powerful; you might try getting access to those states in situations when you need them.
  3. Modeling: Some people can do things that you wish that you could do. One of my past clients was intensely self-critical – and even self-critical of being self-critical – and he asked me how other people who were less successful than him could still be ‘content’ while he was feeling inadequate. So I asked him to study them. Get to know them and find out, how do they do it?
  4. Questions: Ask yourself about how you could feel how you want to feel. For example, if I want to feel “grateful”, I could ask myself, “What do I feel grateful about right now?” And if you can’t think of anything, you can change it to, “What could I feel grateful about right now?” And of course, you can just replace “grateful” with any other emotion that you like – excitement, joy, love, delight, passion, peace or anything else you would like to feel.

We are surrounded by teachers in the world around us. I was once told that when I met someone who was excellent, that I should recognize what it was in them that was excellent, and strive to emulate or copy that, and upon meeting someone with had a character failing that bothered me, that I should strive to amend that defect in myself.

Being able to choose how you feel – what Carmen Bostic St Clair refers to as State Choice – is one of the most direct ways to upgrade your performance. You’ll be amazed at how easily you can start to notice the change.

New Code Games

24 Apr 11
Daniel Smith
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5 comments

Being “in the zone” can be an incredible feeling. Whether it’s that feeling of making a presentation “just right”, or being in a negotiation when things “just work”, or hitting the golf ball “perfectly”, when things work for us, when we are at our very best, it can be amazing.

New Code Games are typically used to generate Content Free High Performance States. These valuable states can then be used to enrich and upgrade our state in situations that we are facing – whether it is public speaking, creative thinking, problem solving or being out on the town – or to help us handle aspect from our personal history that have been getting in the way.

The Alphabet Game is usually the first one that I usually share. Rhythm of Life and Breath of Life are pretty straightforward too. The NASA Game is pretty well-known too, likewise the Croydon Ball Game. But there are always more.

Jack Carroll created Alphabet Touch as a variation of the Alphabet Game when he was working with a client who was blind. Though it’s easy to learn, scalable, and does away with the need for writing up charts altogether. Daryll Scott developed another overlapping the Alphabet Game with the Stroop Task.

Juggling itself has many of the characteristics of the content free high performance state. It uses a huge amount of our brain by virtue of its stimulation of our vestibular system, left and right motor cortexes – and for most people, it’s not a ‘normal’ activity, so the risk of overlap is minimized. Plus it’s fun – and my 16mo son loves watching me practising! The main limitations are the lack of engagement of our auditory loop (auditory short term memory) and the lack of easy scalability.

We have been experimenting with juggling while rhythmically reading off the letters of words. But not just left to right: Instead, the first letter, then the last letter, then the second letter, then the second last letter, etc. So, for example, D, L, A, E, N, I for Daniel.
Likewise, we have tried using variations on table tennis where the way the ball is hit is manipulated – combining aspects of Alphabet, NASA and Croydon Ball Games. It’s just limited to situations where you’ve got a table tennis table, though fortunately there are usually quite a few of those around 🙂